Now Available: Lynda training for the Nikon D800 and Canon 5D Mark III

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If you’re the lucky own of a Nikon D800 or Canon EOS 5D Mark III, and you’d like to know more about how to use either camera, then you’ll want to check out my two latest Lynda.com courses. Both classes walk you through all the critical features and operations of each camera, and are designed to work in concert with my Foundations of Photography series. Note that the 5D Mark III class is also ideally suited for users of the 5D Mark II. Click here if you’re a 5D user or click here if you’re a D800 user.

Florence, 2009 – Tuscan Digital Photo Workshop

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In August I had the great good fortune to spend the month in Florence, teaching a three-week photo workshop to eight delightful students. Held at the Santa Reparata International School of the Arts, this workshop was held alongside a number of other workshops including book arts, Solarplate printing, painting, and more. With the extended class time, we were able to cover a lot of ground, and with Florence and the surrounding country just outside the door we had plenty of shooting opportunities.

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Pigeons

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Reader Graham Long (no relation) sends in an image that he titled "An Almost Quite Good Photo." As he describes it: "the shot was taken at Granville Island in Vancouver. My wife took the kids for a bite to eat and I rattled off more than 250 ill-considered shots in about 15 minutes." Graham’s experience shows the merit of heavy shooting, as his blitzkrieg approach delivered an image that truly is almost quite good. However, there are just one or two issues that keep it from being a an outright quite good photo, and in this Before and After we’re going to discuss what those issues are, and explore some ways that you can fix them in an image editor.

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Lit Building

Posted by & filed under Before & After.

Learning to spot a potential photograph is one of the most difficult parts of becoming a better photographer. Complicating the process is the fact that the photograph you take is often not a finished product, but simply the raw material that you’ll use to construct a final image. Very often, the world will present you with scenes that are good potential photographs, not perfect finished images. Learning to recognize the potential image that exists in a scene is a function of experience, and an understanding of what is possible with your chosen camera and image processing tools.

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