Now Available: Lynda training for the Nikon D800 and Canon 5D Mark III

November 9, 2012 by · 5 Comments
Filed under: Features 

If you’re the lucky own of a Nikon D800 or Canon EOS 5D Mark III, and you’d like to know more about how to use either camera, then you’ll want to check out my two latest Lynda.com courses. Both classes walk you through all the critical features and operations of each camera, and are designed to work in concert with my Foundations of Photography series. Note that the 5D Mark III class is also ideally suited for users of the 5D Mark II. Click here if you’re a 5D user or click here if you’re a D800 user.

Some Notes on Canon’s Evaluative Metering

September 20, 2012 by · 12 Comments
Filed under: Features 

I’ve been shooting with Canon SLRs for a long time, and for the most part, I’ve always been pleased with the camera’s metering. Granted, I can never remember which icon corresponds to which metering mode, but now that I keep the PDF of the manual on my phone, I can always look it up. During a recent shoot, though, I came across a curious detail about Evaluative metering that I never knew – one that can dramatically alter metering behavior in certain situations.

Read more

Revisited: Do you need a full-frame sensor?

March 29, 2010 by · 11 Comments
Filed under: Features 

Five years ago, I wrote this piece on whether you should buy a full-frame or cropped sensor digital camera. At the time, cameras with a full-frame sensor were substantially more expensive than cropped-sensor cameras, and a lot of people believed that, eventually, cropped-sensor cameras would be phased out and replaced by more affordable full-frame cameras. Five years later, we’ve seen that that’s not going to happen, but the question remains: do you need full-frame or is a cropped sensor camera okay?

Read more

Should you upgrade from a Canon 5D to a 5D Mark II? Part II

January 28, 2009 by · 9 Comments
Filed under: Reviews 

It says a lot about the Canon EOS 5D that, years after its debut, the release of a successor does not necessarily compel 5D users to upgrade, even though the new model packs 21 megapixels, improved high ISO performance, and burst speed, high-def video, and more. The fact is, the original 5D is a great camera, and many users are coming to realize that they may have all the pixels they need for the type of output they do. However, the 5D Mark II’s improved noise performance and interface changes are good enough that, depending on what and how you shoot, the cost of an upgrade might be worth it. And, while you don’t need 21 megapixels for every shot, the ability to print large, and crop tight, can be welcome in many situations. In Part 1, I looked at the interface and physical changes between the 5D and the 5D Mark II. Now it’s time to discuss image quality.

Read more

Should you upgrade from a Canon 5D to a 5D Mark II? Part I

December 15, 2008 by · 19 Comments
Filed under: Reviews 

As a friend pointed out a few months ago, it used to be that you bought a camera that you liked, and you used it for years and years, if not the rest of your life. While you might change films regularly, and experiment with new processing techniques, once you’d chosen a camera, it was a tool that you committed to for the long haul. Like me, my friend has been shooting with a 5D for years, and we were discussing how, if we had to use that camera and only that camera for the rest of our lives, we’d actually be content, and would not be limited in our ability to create great images. (At least, not limited by our camera choice.) Then Canon released the 5D Mark II.

Read more

  • Nothing Else to Buy!



    Seventh Edition
    Order Now!

    Complete Digital Photography
    by Ben Long.

    Everything you want and need to know about digital photo-
    graphy - from buying a camera, to editing your images, to making your final prints. Completely reorgan-
    ized and loaded with more content than any previous edition!



  • Classes at Lynda.com



    Lenses

    Foundations of Photography
    by Ben Long.

    Good photography is largely a process of making choices, and many of the critical choices you must make when taking a shot center around your lens. What focal length should you choose? How does that affect camera position? What about lens aperture, stabilization, and on and on. In this course, you'll explore all of the critical decisions that center around your camera's lens. An essential counterpart to Foundations of Photography: Exposure.




  • More To Read

    Learn to raw!




    New Edition!
    Order Now!

    by Ben Long.

    Take advantage of your camera's raw mode to shoot better images. For Windows or Mac users of Photoshop CS3, CS4, and Photoshop Elements, this book teaches you everything you need to know about raw shooting.

    Click here for more info!